Autumn Haiku poetry by Jean Aked

Elements of Poetry Alliteration

Glossary of Terms: Elements of Poetry Alliteration: The repetition of the same or similar consonant sounds in words that are close together. Ex: The sneaky, slippery snake. Allusion: A reference to someone or something that is known from history, literature, religion, politics, sports, science, or some other branch of culture (with out say the name).
Context Clues: Using words surrounding unknown words to determine their meaning. Couplet: Two consecutive lines of poetry that work together. Drawing Conclusions: Use written cues to figure out something that is not directly stated. Free Verse: Poetry that does not conform to a regular meter or rhyme scheme.
Haiku: Presents a vivid picture and the poet’s impressions, sometimes with suggestions of spiritual insight. The traditional haiku is three lines long: the first line is five syllables, the second is seven syllables, and the third line is five syllables.
Hyperbole: A figure of speech that uses incredible exaggeration, or overstatement, for effect.
Ex. I could eat a horse right now. There were a million people at the game.
Imagery: The use of language to evoke a picture or a concrete sensation of a person, a thing, a place, or an experience.
Inferring: Giving a logical guess based on the facts or evidence presented using prior knowledge to help “read between the lines”
Irony: In general, it is the difference between the way something appears and what is actually true.
Meaning: What the poem is about.
Metaphor: A figure of speech that makes a comparison between two unlike things without using the words like or as. Ex. Education is a life raft in the ocean.
Mood: The feeling created in the reader by the poem or story.
Onomatopoeia: The use of a word whose sound imitates or suggests its meaning. Ex. Boom! Smash! Pow! Pssst. Ssshh! Buzz. Splash. Etc.